Category Archives: art

Untitled

2 Comments

Filed under art, photography, this and that

Enchanted Conversation Artist Spotlight: Eveline Wallace

ArtistSpotlight-JUNE2018-EvelineWallace

One of the features of Enchanted Conversation Magazine is a monthly “Artist Spotlight”, an article that highlights the work of an artist who does work on the fairy tale/folklore/mythology theme.

For June’s Artist Spotlight, I got to interview my favourite artist: Eveline Wallace! That’s right, her of my “Peace Angel” painting. I went over to her house, interviewed her, and took pictures of her paintings; then she fed me lunch and we had a great visit. Win-win all around.

Hop on over to Enchanted Conversation and check out the interview and Eveline’s great paintings – she’s amazing:

JUNE ARTIST SPOTLIGHT – Meet Eveline Wallace

If you’re interested in being a featured artist for Artist Spotlight, go here and scroll to the bottom for submission requirements.

1 Comment

Filed under art, Enchanted Conversations

Light: A Reflection

I had meant to give you some erudition today on – well, on something. But then I was looking at these pictures on my camera from this morning, and I think they speak quite loudly for themselves; I can shut up.

Here you are:

Light – a Reflection

20180120112921_IMG_0308

 

20180120112828_IMG_0306

 

20180120112845_IMG_0307

 

20180120113415_IMG_0317

“Lux”. Collage on canvas, back-lit, 8×10″. 2017.

 

 

3 Comments

Filed under art, photography, this and that

Peace Angel

I wanted to use it for something special, the payment I got for my first published story. And I found the very thing at the local Christmas Art Show: a painting by my favourite artist, Eveline Wallace. It was priced exactly right.

The actual title of this piece is “Snow”, but I call it “Peace Angel”. (I told Eveline about it, and she approves.) He’s such a cool dude, that angel. So I wrote a poem about him, and here it is – my Christmas greeting to you.

Peace Angel

Eveline Wallace, “Snow”, 2017. Mixed Media, 6×12″.

PEACE ANGEL

Knobbly knees
A Georgian frock coat
Spiked hair like he is
From The Rise of the Guardians
And on his bent arm
The dove.

Snow whirls around him
As he says without words

That peace
Is not saccharine sweetness
Or fluffy emotion

But power,
Fierce courage,
And strength.

 

Wishing  you a wonderful and peaceful Christmas!

12 Comments

Filed under art, life, poetry

“Cat Contemplating Crops”: A Study in Line and Colour

IMG_20170929_073103838

Here you go, have a piece of art to look at. It’s really deep, and meaningful, and stuff.

4 Comments

Filed under art, this and that

World Photography Day!

Helen Jones says it’s World Photography Day (go follow the link and check out some of her awesome photos). So I figured I’d join in the fun with a few pics, some old, some new, a few that I’d saved for using on my blog, and a few of which I’d already posted their brothers (i.e. another photo of the same scene from a different angle). Enjoy!appebarrelsbreadCoffee Creekgranny glassesRose (3)sunset

4 Comments

Filed under art, this and that

Zootopia and The Power of Story


I’ve been thinking about the importance of Story again. My friend E. L. Bates recently posted the transcript of a talk she gave at her local library on that topic (read the full thing here, it’s well worth it). “This is what stories do,” she says, “they sink into our hearts and give us the tools we need to live more fully, more richly, in the everyday world around us.” Yes, exactly.

Last weekend, we went to see the new Disney movie, Zootopia. I’d heard that it was good, so while I wasn’t expecting any great profundity of the flick (it’s a Disney talking-animal movie, after all), I went into it hoping to be amused for a couple of hours and not have too many groaner moments. And those hopes weren’t disappointed.

But what bowled me over was the message of the film. That’s right, a Disney talking-animal flick with a message that I actually found really meaningful. And not the standard follow-your-heart-you-can-be-anything-you-want-to-be one, either (which nowadays just causes an eye-roll reflex in me, but that’s a rant for another day). Now, I don’t want to give any spoilers, the movie still being as new as it is. But what I found astounding is that the makers of Zootopia, who have been working on this movie for, I dunno, years, put out a film that hits right smack-dab at the bull’s eye of the current social issues. It’s as if they’d had a premonition of what the political and social climate of March of 2016 was going to be like, and they set out to tell a story that makes its point far more effectively than any sermon or political rant could do.

And that’s something I found profoundly encouraging. Because, you see, young children aren’t going to go to political rallies. And, let’s face it, most of their parents and grandparents won’t, either. But they’ll go to this movie, because it’s Junior’s birthday and you’ve got to do something with that horde of little hoodlums he’s insisted on inviting. So you take them to the movies to see the story of a perky little bunny rabbit from the country who wants to be a big-city cop, and hope that her and her sly-fox sidekick’s adventure will keep the kids quiet for a couple of hours. And in the process, Junior, his friends, and Mommy, Daddy and Grandma, without even noticing it, are being taught some lessons that couldn’t be more important in this moment in history, lessons about the insidiousness of fear and prejudice and of the power of acceptance.

But let me quote E. L. Bates again: “But [the stories] are not instruction manuals thinly disguised as entertainment! Perish the thought! If you set out, in writing a story, to point a moral or teach people something, you have failed before you’ve even begun.” In the case of Zootopia, Disney most certainly did not fail. It’s a well-told story in its own right, full of endearing characters that will enter the Disney canon, with great animation and jokes (including quite a few that will zip right over Junior’s head, but provide Mom & Dad with a good chuckle – including the teensy little Mafioso shrew with his nasal Godfather drawl). We’ll keep watching this film for decades to come for its story, because it’s a good movie – and in the process, its profound message is going to be absorbed into our collective psyche.

The pen (or in this case, film camera) is mightier than the sword – and that is something that can give us all hope.

Life, the Universe, and Zootopia. Story wins again.

4 Comments

Filed under art, this and that, writing